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Industrial Policy Meeting, New Delhi 2005

December 12, 2005

National Council of Applied Economic Research   New Delhi, India

Although the term industrial policy has earned a poor reputation in the past, this prescription has been successfully employed in what are now some of the most vibrant emerging markets. India, China and Brazil, for instance, have had remarkable success in boosting economic growth, and in diffusing the benefits of technology led growth. Industrial policy can and does work, when the right industries are supported and when commerce has large spillovers.

Since it last met, the Industrial Policy task force added two new members who will use the upcoming meeting to discuss the past and future of industrial policy in India and China. Participants also reviewed final drafts of papers for their forthcoming publication. This task force meeting was held from 12 - 13th of December in partnership with the National Council of Applied Economic Research.

  • Yilmaz Akyüz
    Task Force Member
    Former Director, Globalization and Development Strategies (retired)
    United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
  • Alice Amsden
    Task Force Member
    Professor
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Antonio Barros de Castro
    Task Force Member
    Professor
    Universidad Federal Rio de Janeiro
  • Heloisa Borges
    Task Force Member
    Student
    Universidad Federal Rio de Janeiro
  • Mario Cimoli
    Task Force Chair
    Professor of Economics
    Ca' Foscari University of Venice
  • Giovanni Dosi
    Task Force Chair
    Professor of Economics
    Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies of Pisa
  • Michael Hobday
    Task Force Member
    Professor in Innovation Management
    University of Sussex
  • Mushtaq Khan
    Task Force Member
    Senior Professor in Economics
    The School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
  • Gabriel Palma
    Task Force Member
    University Lecturer
    University of Cambridge
  • Wilson Peres
    Task Force Member
    Chief, Unit on Industrial and Technological Development
    United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC-UN)
  • Annalisa Primi
    Task Force Member
    Economist
    Development Centre
    Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development
  • Ajit Singh
    Task Force Member
    Professor of Economics
    University of Cambridge
Institutions and Policies Shaping Industrial Development: An Introductory Note

64kb pdf
Joseph Stiglitz,
Mario Cimoli,
Giovanni Dosi

The Roles of Research at Universities and Public Labs in Economic Catch-up

101kb pdf
Roberto Mazzoleni

We draw upon historical evidence from several countries and contemporary studies of national innovation systems to argue that indigenous systems of academic training and public research have been in the past important elements of the institutional structures supporting a country’s economic catch up. Recent changes in the international economic environment, and the growing scientific basis for contemporary technologies, will make those systems even more important in the future. The contributions of universities and public labs to the development of indigenous technological capabilities have taken different forms in different countries and economic sectors. However, we note that, in contrast with current emphasis on university-based embryonic inventions and fundamental research, effective research programs have predominantly occurred in the application-oriented sciences and engineering, and have been oriented towards problem-solving, and the advancement of technologies of interest to a well-defined user-community.